Tag Archives: linkedin

Social Media ROI & LinkedIn’s Social RecruitIn event

As a business owner – it’s often difficult to step outside of what we do day to day working ‘in’ the business) – to take time out to work ‘on’ the business. However, whilst it’s difficult – I recognise it’s also absolutely necessary.

For me, when I get the opportunity to talk at an event – it’s the perfect opportunity to do some working ‘on’.

Yesterday I had the pleasure of being part of LinkedIn’s Social RecruitIn event, at the Business Design Centre, focused on helping agencies to build, engage and recruit.

The conference theme was around the Art and Science of Recruitment – covering talks from both the creative art side and the data drive science side.

My talk focused on Measuring the Value of Social Media – giving a quick update on where we are with social media, from a technology and stats perspective – and then providing a practical framework for how to measure social.

ROI Mother

Key to measuring anything is, of course, determining the metrics – and then critical to identifying the return – is attaching a monetary value to those metrics.

I couldn’t resist kicking off my including the colourful and creative Gary Vaynerchuk’s (@garyvee) analogy ‘What’s the ROI of your Mother?’ – and that certainly become a continuous theme to the start of many of the conversations I had during the day (so thanks Gary).

Of course, whilst I agree with Gary that it’s often tricky to measure some of the more intangible aspects of social – I disagree that it’s impossible. There are certainly concrete elements that can be measured – the all important aspect is determining what it is you are setting out to achieve and then what you are going to measure to determine whether you’re getting there and achieving results.

I’ll put together a webinar on this very soon – so if you’d like to join that – email me and I’ll be sure to loop you in.

My session was followed by morning tea – and then @JamesCaan took to the stage – sharing his insights into how social media can be used directly within the recruitment industry – and showcasing how he is applying social media activity to leverage opportunities.

My favourite session on the morning saw Dave Hazlehurst (@googledave) take to the stage to lead a discussion on Amplifying your brand through social.

Dave

Dave’s punchy character, passion for his topic and delivery style certainly grabbed attention – and in just 20 minutes he shared so many nuggets and takeaways around content marketing; the power of stories, content ideas around education and pain points and brand amplification.  Always great to meet and connect with people that really talk the same language and I’ll certainly be tuning in to his musings and reading his book, Getting Goosebumps.

Over lunch I was fortunate to get to listen to the headline keynote, Lou Adler (@LouA), CEO of The Adler Group – who was holding a Q&A. I really enjoyed his stance on performance based hiring. Aspects of which that could be applied not only to recruitment but many other sectors and areas of business.

After lunch I was keen to see Ollie Sharp, Senior Sales Manager at LinkedIn – talking and leading a panel on How Senior Leads and Consultants Give a Brand a Personality.  The session focused on the growing area of ‘the SocialCEO’ – and how socially connected a CEO is can drive brand and intention throughout an organisation.  Showcasing CEO’s doing it well – eg: Richard Branson – and then getting two CEO’s on stage to provide a grass roots overview as to how they are driving social within their businesses. I was delighted to see that in both cases, they showed tangible positive results to profitability, directly related to their social activity.

Proving the point that if social is done well, driven by strategic and business objectives, has buy in at the top level and is cascaded throughout the entire business – it is mighty powerful.

It was great to finally meet Ollie – as he and I had been tweeting for some time. Ollie had purchased several copies of The Business of Business Social some time ago advising that he made it mandatory for his sales team to read.  It transpires that having read it – it gave Ollie the inspiration to completely reposition their sales proposition to their audiences.

ollie

It was wonderful to receive praise and thanks, not only from Ollie, but also from Dan Dackombe, Sales Director EMEA and Greg Stephenson, Global Head of Solutions Product Marketing – as to what they had taken from the book to help them rethink how they sold their solutions.  Praise indeed.

In fact, at interview level, The Business of Being Social – is the book sales team candidates have to read and then present on. It’s always great to hear stories about how people have been inspired and impacted by the work you do – and so this is really wonderful news – and something that both David and I are immensely proud of.

My favourite keynote of the day was certainly Susie Wolff – Racing Driver, Williams F1 Team member – shared her story about finding her passion for racing at the tender age of 8 and the importance of staying in the moment, being prepared, finding your purpose and dreaming big.

Susie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DFWIt was a fabulous day – both enjoyable and useful.  A great event all round – and I couldn’t leave the blog without mentioning the brilliant MC for the day – Deborah Frances-White. A master of ceremonies if ever there was one. She brought all aspects of the day together perfectly, connected with the audience – made everyone feel comfortable and wholly involved. A true star.

As always – any questions tweet me @michellecarvill or email michelle@carvillcreative.co.uk.

 Michelle Carvill, best selling business author, speaker, founder and Director at Carvill – the social media marketing agency. For information about how the team at Carvill can help you – simply get in touch or visit our website for more information.

 

 

How To Sponsor Content On Your LinkedIn Showcase Page

If you’re not sure what LinkedIn showcase pages are, then be sure to have a read of our previous blog written earlier this year when we said farewell to LinkedIn’s ‘Products and Services’ page.

Meanwhile here’s a little reminder…

A showcase page, enables you to highlight a particular brand or product line and extend your company’s page presence. The aim is to get as many LinkedIn members as possible to follow your product’s page in the hope that it’s something they’re interested in. They’re useful for building long term relationships with those who want to follow specific aspects of your business.

The followers of your showcase page know to expect news about your product/service and are looking forward to hearing all about it. The updates on this page work just like company updates, but with added benefit of LinkedIn members being able to find the product or service through search.

Now that you’ve come to an understanding about showcase pages – the next step is to get people following and interested in your page. If you’re struggling to get people to following your showcase page, then it might be worth paying for some advertising – using ‘sponsored updates.’

Sponsored Updates

A sponsored update is used to promote a piece of content to a wider audience. Sponsoring a piece of content on your showcase page will help to get your message out to the right people as well as raising greater brand awareness, generating quality leads and promote deeper relationships with your audience.

In order to create the relationships that matter to you – the first step is to publish the content that you want to sponsor – directly in your showcase page’s feed.

Once you’ve published the content, you can then go on to targeting your audience. All you need to do is click on the picture in the top right hand side of your screen and scroll down to click on ‘Advertising.’

sponsor 1

 

 

 

 

Once your advertising dashboard is open, you need to make sure you have an account set up so that you can pay for the advertising on your sponsored page. Click on the drop down arrow where it lists your page names and select ‘create your business account.’

sponsor 2

This window will then open up and it is here where you can set up the advertising for your showcase page rather than your actual company page. Select the second option ‘Company Page URL’ – and then copy and paste the URL of your showcase page into the text box.

You can then go on to giving your business account a title – something that is clear and easy to remember – and don’t forget to also select the correct currency you’re going to be using. Once everything is filled out you can select ‘Create’ – this will then create a business account for your showcase page.

sponsor 3



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When it comes to creating the actual ad, make sure the correct business account is selected at the top of the screen (preferably the one you’ve just created) – in our case we are sponsoring from ‘Carvill Creative Limited.’ You then have to pick between the two advertising options LinkedIn gives you – one is to create an ad for the page and the other is to sponsor content – the one you want to select is ‘Sponsor Content’.

sponsor 4

Once you’ve selected your ad choice, scroll down and select the piece of content you want to sponsor. This content should be something you think is relevant and will get people wanting to follow your showcase page – this content might be an important blog post, press, news item or simply a link to that product or service on your website. Click on the correct post and then make your way through the targeting options you want to use – you can target these ads by country, locations, seniority, function, business size etc.

Whatever you decide to sponsor – it’s often best practice to post that piece of content first and leave it to simmer for a while before sponsoring. This will then give you the opportunity to compare your sponsored post to your organic post and you can see how well your post is doing just by looking back and comparing the engagement rates.

Happy Sponsoring Folks!

How To Choose Your Social Media Channels Wisely

social media channelsOnce your business has made a decision to jump on the social media bandwagon, the next decision is to decide upon what channels to use and how much time do you want to spend posting, tweeting, pinning, cricling, creating or following?

When making these decisions, businesses often make the mistake of signing up to all the most popular networks, hoping to have a business impact by reaching the right customers straight away. The reality is that it’s virtually impossible to do them all – or at least do them all well.

Businesses that do try, often go in all guns blazing, then after a week or two, due to the lack of responses to their online activities, the use of social media channels by that business rapidly dwindles – and they’ll often end up with a Facebook page with a couple of half-hearted posts on them, or Twitter feed with the latest tweets being 6 months old. This end result can actually be more damaging to your business than not having any social network presence at all.

The one piece of advice we can give you is to choose your channels wisely – don’t try to be everywhere! The important thing you need to figure out is which channels are dominant for your market.

In social media, it’s about quality, not just quantity. Doing two or three channels really well with consistent, highly engaging content is what will lead to conversion and customers.

Here are a few ways to come to the conclusion about the right social media channels for you:

  • Where does your business sit in the social media space?
  • Are you aiming to build a community presence? If so then Facebook, Twitter and Google+ could be for you.
  • Does your business use a lot of images? If so then perhaps Instagram or Pinterest is the way to go.
  • If you’re a business can provide professional and useful insights for others within your industry then get yourselves on LinkedIn.
  • Think about your target audience – where is your target buyer and what channels are they using?
  • Have a look at your competitors – what channels are they using? Are they doing well on social?
  • Do you have time to be working on all the social media sites? How many channels do you think you can do really well on?
  • Have a clear social media strategy in place – then you can work out a plan that you can realistically implement.
  • Keep in mind that social media takes time, especially if you want to build up a reputation – so don’t get frustrated if you’re not getting instant results.

It’s very important that you choose the right channel or channels from the outset and it’s equally important that you do not get distracted in trying to support your profiles on those channels.

Whichever social networks you choose to use, be prepared to sufficiently resource the activity – this will take some time, skills and prompt responses to build up the right social network for your business. Once you’ve learnt how to master one or two channels to begin with, you can than progress to the next one.

You’ll be surprised at how much time an effective social media presences takes up – so don’t overburden yourself initially, as that is a guaranteed recipe for failure.

Is LinkedIn Following the Footsteps of Facebook too?

Many of us have come to the conclusion that Twitter’s redesign brings it in line with Facebook but is LinkedIn also following in similar footsteps?

Although LinkedIn haven’t gone as far as Twitter in announcing a big redesign – they have made a few changes to their homepage.





LinkedIn are clearly looking for ways to improve the way content is shared within the feed – making sure that job related information stands out in the homepage.

Their updated homepage takes advantage of the separation of stories shared with easily digestible updates from your connections.

You can now customise everything you want to see directly from your LinkedIn homepage – where you can segment your updates by ‘all updates’, ‘shares’, ‘connections’, ‘profiles’, ‘news groups’, ‘companies’ and ‘jobs’. This feature makes it easier to see what’s going on as it allows you to view what’s happening in your network from each different perspective (Twitter brought out something similar with their redesign).

Another feature that LinkedIn have applied, that is also similar to Facebook, is the ‘hide feature’ – this is where you can hide someone’s updates from your homepage. For those people who continuously post similar and repeated updates which hit your feed – whilst you don’t necessarily want to lose them as a connection, you don’t necessarily want to see everything they publish – so you can hide their updates. To action the ‘hide’ feature – all you need to do is scroll over their name in blue (in the homepage) and the hide button will appear to the right.

Images also seem to have increased in size – and you can now clearly see images of your connections or clearer images of the articles that they are sharing. Not only this, but there are larger ‘share’ and ‘connect’ buttons, making it easier for users to network interact and broadcast status updates.

It seems that every social media platform is setting out with the aim of everything looking bigger, and everything being made easier for users to share and view stories/status updates.

So, with all of these changes being made to LinkedIn – have you noticed the similarities to Facebook?

Do let us know your thoughts and opinions on this topic – share your comments below or simply tweet us at @carvillcreative.

This blog post was brought to you by Michelle Carvill, founder of Carvill Creative, the online visibility experts and author of The Business of Being Social – A Practical Guide to Harnessing the Power of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn for all Businesses.

If you need any help with your social media activity, blogging or creating content or any other digital marketing services, then do get in touch with us.

10 Ways to Optimise Your LinkedIn Profile – via Google Hangout

Following on from our recent blog post 10 Tips to Leverage LinkedIn for Business – if you prefer to listen and watch the tips via Google Hangout – here’s the recording of a recent webinar with Business Training Made Simple – featuring Carvill Creative’s director @michellecarvill sharing insights.

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10 Tips for Leveraging LinkedIn for Business

  1. Change your LinkedIn URL to your name. This way you have a public URL which you can promote and share on email footers or business cards – to showcase you.   And be sure to add other URLs such as your Website, Blog or Twitter URL too. Consider this your ‘personal PR profile’ where people can find out everything about you that you wish them to know.
  2. Create a Search Friendly ‘Does what it says on the tin’ Headline.  You get 120 characters to create your ‘Headline’ on LinkedIn. Your Headline is the first thing people get to see when looking at your profile. Your photo and your headline. Therefore, make sure it makes sense.  If it just says something generic such as ‘Partner at Blogs and Co’ or ‘Product Manager’ – then that’s not specific enough. People are likely to search for you including some form of sector or specialising eg: Construction and Dispute Resolution Expert Lawyer and Partner at Blogs and Co.  ‘Product Manager in Leading Inbound Marketing Software organisation Blogs & Co’.
  3. Optimise your profile with relevant ‘Keywords’.  Following on from point 2 – be sure you continue to build the rest of the content within your profile keeping those all important search keywords in mind.  This will help your profile to appear as high as possible on Google and LinkedIn searches.
  4. Get to All Star.  Keep your profile as ‘full’ as possible– LinkedIn provide you with a gauge of ‘completeness’ (Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Expert, All Star).  Strive to be All Star – it really should take you no more than an hour to get your profile to All Star.  Getting to All Star means that you show up more in searches – and it looks more professional too – who wants to be a beginner on the largest professional network in the world?
  5. Personalise all messages when inviting people to connect (don’t use the standard message).  Research has shown that people are more likely to accept and appreciate the connection if you provide some personal context – eg: Great meeting you at ABC the other day – I’d like to keep in touch by connecting on LinkedIn.
  6. Endeavour to look at your Profile Page everyday.  Every time you update your profile and show activity – you are ‘visible’. In the off-line world of networking there is a saying: Visibility + Credibility = Profitability. In simple terms – the more you are visible in your contacts’ minds the more they know what you are up to the more likely they are to contact you or think of you for a relevant reason – which may lead to business referral, hence profitability. Participation is key.
  7. Don’t attempt to spam or directly sell. People will disconnect with you faster than you know if they think you are just there to sell your wares. Think of offline networking, you wouldn’t start a partnership or conversation by trying to sell someone something – engage, listen and nurture your contacts – don’t spam them. If someone is specifically discussing something you have a solution for – then sure, engage – but listen in first – don’t spam. Relevancy is key. I often get spammed about social media training – or do I want a marketing plan! Er no thanks – have you even bothered to look at my profile!
  8. Be targeted. You may want to promote a product or service directly into an audience. And the beauty of LinkedIn is that the demographic information is really very granular (more so on social networks than on any other medium). The Advanced Search feature gives you an idea of what you can drill down to beyond age and title. It may be that you consider running a LinkedIn Ad whereby you serve advertising to a highly targeted audience.
  9. Grow your authority. Join relevant groups and get involved in relevant discussions and share your knowledge. With groups you can add a new topic to garner opinion or advice. If there isn’t a relevant group for what you do – then you can easily create a group and then search for relevant contacts and people and invite them to that group. If you’re not directly connected to a person – then you can always ask one of your contacts that is connected to invite them. The ‘get introduced’ referral process is very powerful for that purpose. See the Groups tab to create a Group – and search Groups to find relevant groups.
  10. Get recommendations. Asking contacts, colleagues, peers, clients, delegates etc for recommendations couldn’t be easier on LinkedIn. It’s a very simple process. Click your Profile and Recommendations and then you can simply select which contacts you want to get Recommendations from. There is research to say that those users with recommendations grow credibility and are more likely to get requests for advice and to be found in searches – and of course, you can use the recommendations in other marketing materials and on your website etc.

So – there are my 10 quick tips for Leveraging LinkedIn – any other tips or tactics you may have, then please do share – always keen to hear more.

This blog post was brought to you by Michelle Carvill, founder of Carvill Creative, the online visibility experts and author of The Business of Being Social – A Practical Guide to Harnessing the Power of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn for all Businesses.

If you need any help with your social media activity, blogging or creating content or any other digital marketing services, then do get in touch with us.

Social Karma – Doing Someone a Small Favour Creates Advocacy and Makes Good Business Sense

We received a request via our website  for a quote to assist someone with uploading images to their LinkedIn Company Page.

A 5 minute phone call later, we quickly ascertained that it was probably a resizing and formatting issue.

We advised that we could fix things very quickly for them – and of course, we were asked, ‘How much will it charge – as I will have to get a PO approved before we can go ahead.’

The job was realistically a 10 min job to fix – and all in all we probably spent  a total of 30 minutes end to end.

We could have charged a fee for this task – however, as an agency, whilst we’re commercial, we’re also fair and reasonable.

Instead, we said, there’s no charge. It’s a small job, won’t take more than 10 minutes – and instead, tell people how nice we are.

We fixed the problem – and by the time we’d fixed the problem – they had made a post on our Facebook Page, their own Facebook Page, personal Twitter and business Twitter accounts – sharing the news that we were indeed; friendly, personable, knowledgable , refreshing and impressive – and come highly recommended.

It transpires that the person we spoke to is a consultant – and works with many organisations – and so she too will be spreading the news beyond that organisation and recommending us to her other clients.  In her words – I’ll return that favour over and over again.  Thank you so much.

Had I tried to pay for such promotional advocacy – then it would have cost much more than we would have charged for this small job.  And it would have given her a very different viewpoint on who we are as an agency.  Penny pinching charge by the minute – or who we are, fair and reasonable.

So, next time, you’re asked to do a small job – think about the advocacy factor – I guarantee doing a good turn for someone once, will pay much higher dividends in the end.

This blog post was brought to you by Michelle Carvill, founder of Carvill Creative, the online visibility experts and author of The Business of Being Social – A Practical Guide to Harnessing the Power of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn for all Businesses.

If you need any help with creating content or anything else then do get in touch with us.

Michelle Carvill’s Chapter Insights – LinkedIn

Introducing the LinkedIn Chapter of ‘The Business of Being Social.’

Michelle Carvill, the Founder and Director of Carvill Creative has co-authored the book ‘The Business of Being Social.’

We’ll be sharing some taster videos with you over the next few days, sharing ‘Michelle Carvill’s Social Media insights’ – discussing chapters within the book.

Introducing the third Social Media Insight – LinkedIn

See the video to find out more…

We hope that THIS social media insights video has given you a taster of what to expect from the book!

If you haven’t got your copy already… You can order yours here!

For further updates visit www.thebusinessofbeingsocial.co.uk

Also, you can stay tuned by following the book on Twitter!

The Business of Being Social

About the book:

The Founder and Director of Carvill Creative; Michelle Carvill has co-authored the book ‘The Business of Being Social.’ Along with David Taylor the Managing Director of 2010 Media – together, they have created the Social Media book of the year!

The Business of Being Social is your very own practical guide to harnessing the power of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube for all businesses.

It breaks down every aspect of Social Media from the basics to the most complex issues and  explains step-by-step how you can create a strategy for success.

Social media has exploded onto our screens (be they desktop, mobile, tablet or even TV), but most businesses are confused how to harness the benefits of social media platforms for business – this book will guide your business to make sure you’re using social media to its full potential!

You’ll learn how to:

  • Create a viable social media strategy.
  • Build and use channels such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn and YouTube.
  • Create customised apps, communities and optimise your use of keywords.
  • Monitor conversations, mentions and other activity.
  • Understand your audience and the content they want.
  • Integrate your social media activity into your marketing strategy.

Latest News:

The book officially launched on Friday 24th May 2013.

If you’re looking for more information about The Business of Being Social, then check out the video where co-authors Michelle Carvill and David Taylor talk about why they wrote the book.

We’ll also be running a blog every day next week giving you insights into each chapter called ‘Michelle Carvill’s social media insights’ where she talks about various chapters within the book.

The book is also going to feature in The Chartered Institute of Marketing’s Business Book of the Month in June… so stay tuned for that!

If you haven’t got your copy already… You can order yours here!

For further updates visit www.thebusinessofbeingsocial.co.uk

Also don’t forget to follow the book on Twitter!

Leveraging LinkedIn…very simply, it’s about harnessing the relationships you already have.

When talking to a new client about social media or indeed when training to a group of businesses on the subject, the one social network that I find most business people feel more comfortable with – and have therefore started to engage with (ie: created a profile) – is LinkedIn.

Often branded as ‘The Professionals’ Facebook’ – over the years LinkedIn has certainly had the reputation of being the business to business resource. And until recently, most research in the four main channels, Facebook, Twitter,Logo-LinkedInYouTube and LinkedIn, identified this to be the case.

And of course, that makes perfect sense.

LinkedIn started out largely as a ‘recruitment resource’ – a place where professionals could share their expertise and pitch for new ‘contracts’ or be head-hunted for positions. In fact, to date, the premium ‘paid for’ subscriptions are still largely the domain of recruitment consultants and head hunters wanting to make contact with highly targeted candidates.

I know a number of my friends and colleagues that have secured new roles, be they full-time or contract via LinkedIn – and so it works for that purpose, quite beautifully.

Of course, as with all of the networks – LinkedIn has evolved, and continues to evolve. Businesses can now create ‘Company Profiles’ – to showcase products and services – and also connect all employees.  So, it’s no longer just about individuals showcasing their wares but instead, another space for businesses to promote their people and their products and services – with the itention to engage, to meet likeminded individuals via Groups and to grow authority via Answers.

How to use LinkedIn for Business

If I were to explain Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn very quickly – I would say this:

  • Twitter is a perfect mouthpiece for sharing content and information and connecting and engaging with those that you have never met, nor would ever have had the opportunity to meet – due to location and time constraints. It’s perfect for capturing conversations and listening in and generating traction back to your website.
  • Facebook is the perfect vehicle for creating a community – to engage current audiences and encourage them to market to new audiences via viral worthy campaigns and compelling content, providing the potential to grow audience and awareness. Creating a community of ‘fans or advocates’ – willing to share and engage with your brand or business.

And LinkedIn…

Well, LinkedIn is quite different, LinkedIn is much more about self promotion (something not wholly advocated on Twitter or Facebook) and leveraging the contacts you already have.  So, here are my

12 Tips for Leveraging LinkedIn for Business:

  1. Change your LinkedIn URL to your name. This way you have a public URL which you can promote and share on email footers or business cards – to showcase you.   And be sure to add other URLs such as your Website, Blog or Twitter URL too. Consider this your ‘personal splashpage’ where people can find out everything about you that you wish them to know.
  2. Optimise your profile with relevant ‘Keywords’ as much as possible. This will help your profile to appear as high as possible on Google and LinkedIn searches. Keep your profile as ‘full as possible too – LinkedIn provide you with a gauge of ‘completeness’.  Strive to be 100% complete.
  3. Create a Company Profile. If relevant – create a company profile which enables you to link all relevant team to the profile and also enables you to showcase your Products and Services. Again, ensure that you keyword optimise this area to ensure that you are picked up on relevant searches.
  4. Personalise all messages when inviting people to connect (don’t use the standard message).  Research has shown that people are more likely to accept and appreciate the connection if you provide some personal context – eg: Great meeting you at ABC the other day – I’d like to keep in touch by connecting on LinkedIn.
  5. Endeavour to look at your Profile Page everyday or auto update your status via Twitter or Facebook.  Every time you update your profile and show activity – you are ‘visible’. In the off-line world of networking there is a saying: Visibility + Credibility = Profitability. In simple terms – the more you are visible in your contacts’ minds the more they know what you are up to the more likely they are to contact you or think of you for a relevant reason – which may lead to business referral, hence profitability. Participation is key.
  6. Don’t attempt to spam or directly sell. People will disconnect with you faster than you know if they think you are just there to sell your wares. Think of offline networking, you wouldn’t start a partnership or conversation by trying to sell someone something – engage, listen and nurture your contacts – don’t spam them. If someone is specifically discussing something you have a solution for – then sure, engage – but listen in first – don’t spam. Relevancy is key. I often get spammed about social media training – or do I want a marketing plan! Er no thanks – have you even bothered to look at my profile!
  7. Be targeted. You may want to promote a product or service directly into an audience. And the beauty of LinkedIn is that the demographic information is really very granular (more so on social networks than on any other medium). The Advanced Search feature gives you an idea of what you can drill down to beyond age and title. It may be that you consider running a LinkedIn Ad whereby you serve advertising to a highly targeted audience.
  8. Grow your authority. Join relevant groups and get involved in relevant discussions and share your knowledge. With groups you can add a new topic to garner opinion or advice. If there isn’t a relevant group for what you do – then you can easily create a group and then search for relevant contacts and people and invite them to that group. If you’re not directly connected to a person – then you can always ask one of your contacts that is connected to invite them. The ‘get introduced’ referral process is very powerful for that purpose. See the Groups tab to create a Group – and search Groups to find relevant groups.
  9. Review LinkedIn Answers (often overlooked in the More tab). This feature aggregates conversations and requests by other LinkedIn users. You can select questions based on sector and interest – and see relevant questions. If you participate and share your knowledge the ‘questioner’ may select you as ‘Best Answer’ – a badge which sits on your profile. Simple – and another thing for you to promote.
  10. Get recommendations. Asking contacts, colleagues, peers, clients, delegates etc for recommendations couldn’t be easier on LinkedIn. It’s a very simple process. Click your Profile and Recommendations and then you can simply select which contacts you want to get Recommendations from. There is research to say that those users with recommendations grow credibility and are more likely to get requests for advice and to be found in searches – and of course, you can use the recommendations in other marketing materials and on your website etc.
  11. Let your contacts know they can connect with you on LinkedIn. In Connections – you will see a link for Add Connections. On this page you have various options to connect with your contacts – including an option which is often missed – to invite your Outlook by uploaded a CSV list.
  12. Manage your contacts via LinkedIn. Now when I meet anyone and I get their business card – rather than it scurry about in the bottom of my bag for days, weeks or even months (until I forget the context of the connection) – I now instead, check out LinkedIn – see if they are on there and connect (sending a nice targeted message as point 4. Doing this means that I keep a constant database of contacts, if they change roles etc, I haven’t lost them – as they remain on LinkedIn, it’s just their role that has changed. In LinkedIn Updates (an email you can opt to receive each week or month advising you as to what’s been happening with your contacts – who they’ve connected with, new roles, accolades etc), I could even email that contact to congratulate them on their new role. Nice!  Database management is often a headache – but via LinkedIn – time saving, life lasting and very low maintenance.

So – that’s it. My 12 tips for Leveraging LinkedIn – any other tips or tactics you may have, then please do share – always keen to hear more…

@Michelle Carvill is owner and Marketing Director at Carvill Creative – the online visibility experts. A digital marketing and design agency based in Maidenhead, Berkshire.  The agency covers all aspects of online visibility – covering social media marketing and social media training, user focused website planning and conversion focused website design.

For marketing and social media advice – view the Carvill Creative Blog